IFR operations quiz

670
image: © iStockphoto.com | Matus Duda

For questions 1 to 6, refer to Airservices Avalon ILS-Y or LOC-Y RWY 18 Approach Plate, dated 8 November 2018

1. What is the meaning and significance of the triangle located over the VOR/DME and at waypoint TEMPL?
(a) It is the Initial Approach POINT (IAP) which is the commencement of the instrument approach procedure and where a speed range applies for the aircraft category. For instance, a Category B aircraft must be between 120 and 180 knots from this point.
(b) It is the Initial Approach FIX (IAF) which is the commencement of the instrument approach procedure and where a speed range applies for the aircraft category. For instance, a Category B aircraft must be between 120 and 180 knots from this fix.
(c) It is a compulsory position report for all aircraft before commencement of the instrument approach procedure.
(d) It is an Initial Approach POINT (IAP) which is the commencement of the instrument approach procedure and where a speed range applies for the aircraft category. For instance, a Category B aircraft must be between 85 and 130 knots from this point.

2. What is the meaning and significance of the  Maltese cross located at waypoint IKANO?
(a) It is the Final Approach FIX (FAF) for the ILS from which a speed range applies for the aircraft category. For instance, a Category B aircraft must be between 85 and 130 knots from this fix. Also, the nominal crossing height of 1340 feet is checked.
(b) It is the final approach point (FAP) for the ILS and from which a speed range applies for an aircraft category. For instance, a Category B aircraft must be between 85 and 130 knots from this point. Also, the nominal crossing height of 1340 feet is checked.
(c) It is the FAF, solely for checking the nominal crossing height of 1340 feet against the glideslope centred on the aircraft instrumentation.
(d) It is the FAP, solely for checking the crossing height of NOT BELOW 1200 feet on a localiser (LOC) only approach and thus has no significance on the ILS approach.

3. If the Glidepath (GP) were to become inoperative, what is the meaning and significance of this maltese cross at waypoint  IKANO now?
(a) No change in significance.
(b) It is now an FAP, where the aircraft category speed range still applies and a check of NOT BELOW 1200 feet is done.
(c) It is now an FAF, where the aircraft category speed range still applies and a check of NOT BELOW 1200 feet is done.
(d) It is now an FAF, where the aircraft category speed range still applies and a check of NOT BELOW 1200 feet but with a nominal crossing height of 1340 feet is done.

4. What is the meaning and significance of the abbreviation Mapt at 2 DME/GNSS from the AV VOR/DME?
(a) It is the missed approach point for the LOC approach at the Minimum Descent Altitude (MDA).
(b) It is the missed approach point for both the ILS from the Decision Altitude (DA) and the LOC from the MDA.
(c) It is the missed approach point from the circling minima of a LOC approach.
(d) It is the missed approach point for the ILS from the MDA.

5. Refer to the minima table. What is the significance of the shaded boxes?
(a) 100 feet can be subtracted from all these minima (alternate included) if a QNH can be obtained from an ATIS, AWIS or TTF.
(b) 100 feet can be subtracted from all these minima (alternate included) if a QNH can be obtained from an ATIS only.
(c) 100 feet can be subtracted from all these minima (alternate included) if a QNH can be obtained from either an ATIS or AWIS.
(d) 50 feet can be subtracted from all these minima (alternate included) if a QNH can be obtained from either an ATIS or AWIS.

6. What is the meaning and significance of the abbreviation RDH near the missed approach point on the profile diagram?
(a) It is a Radar Decision Height.
(b) It is the Reference Datum Height for the ILS glidepath, meaning that as the aircraft continues the approach, the glidepath antenna (typically in the vicinity of the nose of the aircraft) is at this height above the runway.
(c) It is the Reference Datum Height for the ILS glidepath, meaning that as the aircraft continues the approach, it is the wheel height of the aircraft above the runway.
(d) It is the equivalent of the Threshold Crossing Height (TCH).
(e) Both (b) and (d) are correct.

Refer to the Airservices TAC 3 for Melbourne (chart dated 8 November 2018) for questions 7 to 10.

7. What is the significance of the  arrowhead  near waypoint VIOLA on the Mangalore (MNG) to  BELTA track?
(a) It is indicating that the magnetic track from VIOLA to BELTA is 197 degrees.
(b) It is indicating that flight in this direction requires prior ATC approval.
(c) It indicates that reference must be made to the ERSA/Route Flight Planning Requirements (GEN-FPR) Section for details before planning this way.
(d) It indicates the Lowest Safe Altitude (LSALT) in this direction. 4100 feet in this case.

8. What is the significance of the arrowhead with a cross near waypoint ESDAN on W382 from Essendon (YMEN) to WENDY?
(a) It is indicating that flight in this direction requires prior ATC approval.
(b) It indicates that reference must be made to the ERSA/Route Flight Planning Requirements (GEN-FPR) Section for details before planning this way.
(c) It indicates that a flight cannot be planned in this direction at any time.
(d) It indicates that you may only plan this route if the aircraft is GNSS RNAV enroute navigation approved since there are no ground based navigation aids for track guidance on this route.

9. What is the significance of the triangle at waypoint SUNTI along H169 from Melbourne VOR (ML)?
(a) It is an Initial Approach Fix (IAF) for an instrument approach.
(b) It is a waypoint for a turn onto a new track.
(c) It is a position report for aircraft with a True Air Speed (TAS) less than 300 knots and for other aircraft as required.
(d) It is a compulsory position report for all aircraft.

10. What is the significance of the asterisk alongside the Melbourne (ML) VOR of 114.1 in the frequency box?
(a) The VOR is paired with a DME.
(b) The controlled airspace range rings and steps are referenced to this navigation aid.
(c) It is a transistorised VOR transmitter.
(d) There is a navigation aid limitation. Refer to the ERSA/Aerodrome and Facilities (FAC) Section.

 

Answers:
1. (b) IAL Legend DAP 0-2
AIP GEN 2.2-14 and AIP ENR 1.5-14 para. 1.16.1
Note that Jeppesen show the Initial Approach Fix with the abbreviation (IAF)
2. (b)IAL Legend DAP 0-3
AIP GEN 2.2-10 and AIP ENR 1.5-14 para 1.16.1
A useful way to remember this is that the letter P for Point is also P for Precision, which the ILS is.
3. (d) IAL Legend DAP 0-3 and Approach Plate
AIP GEN 2.2-10
The LOC is a non-precision approach and thus IKANO at 5.3 AV DME/GNSS is a FAF
4. (a) IAL Legend DAP 0-4
AIP GEN 2.2-8, 19 and 20
In summary, a DA is the minima for landing from an ILS and reaching this DA is when the missed approach must be executed, whereas on a non- precision approach the MDA may be maintained until the geographic missed approach position. In reality they are often almost co-incident. Jeppesen show this position with the letter M.
5. (c) IAL Legend 0-5
AIP ENR 1.5-37 para. 5.3.2
The idea is that an ACTUAL QNH as distinct from a FORECAST QNH is more accurate and thus the lowering by 100 feet.
6. (e) AIP GEN 2.2-23.
It is worth noting that Airbus A380 operators must consider this versus wheel height above the runway due to the large size of the aircraft.
Thus, Category I DA minima must be used at Darwin, Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne, Alice Springs, Perth, Adelaide and Townsville where specific calculations have been confirmed. In other locations these operators must use LOC MDA to allow for this difference. AIP ENR 1.5-36 refers.
7. (c) TAC Chart Legend – Airways and Route Data
ERSA GEN-FPR-15 para. 6.4
In this example, a Melbourne arrival via Mangalore shall plan not above A080.
8. (a) TAC Chart Legend – Airways and Route Data
The relevant contact telephone number can often be found in the ERSA GEN-FPR Section or the Aerodrome/Facilities Section for the terminal area aerodrome served by ATC. In this example, Melbourne.
9. (c) TAC Chart Legend-Airways and Route Data
10. (d) TAC Chart Legend – Navigation Aids
ERSA FAC-22. In this example, scalloping may occur beyond 50NM in sectors 270 to 290 DEG with the ML VOR. Note that Jeppesen use a cross symbol for this in Australia.

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